Call for Papers Leeds/Kalamazoo 2013

The Network for the Study of Late Antique and Early Medieval Monasticism (http://earlymedievalmonasticism.org/Network-Early-Medieval-Monasticism.html) organizes as series of sessions at next year’s International Medieval Conferences in Kalamazoo (May 9-12, 2013) and Leeds (June 1-4, 2013). The deadline for paper submissions was Sept. 15 but if you react very quickly you still have a chance to get into one of our sessions. Here are the descriptions of the proposed sessions:

Kalamazoo 2013: Breaking Down Enclosures: Monks and Society in Early Medieval Europe.

Description: Monks were an integral part of early medieval society, yet much of the modern study of monasticism has placed it within its own historical trajectory rather than as part of early medieval history as a whole. Drawing on the discussions during the sessions on “Negotiating Monasticism in the Early Medieval Ages” at the 2011 Kalamazoo Medieval Congress, and The Contexts of Early Medieval at the 2012 Kalamazoo Medieval Congress these three sessions will explore early medieval monasticism by grounding it in its social, cultural and political contexts. Participants are invited to frame broader conceptual or methodological problem or to present a wider area of research (such as pastoral care, political history, early medieval architecture, literary culture, etc.) and then address the specific role of monastic life and institutions within its broader context.
Hans Hummer is the organizer of our sessions. If you would like to submit a paper, please contact him: hummer@wayne.edu

Leeds 2013: First session: Neglected Texts

Description: Monastic historiography has been substantially based on a limited number of sources. Many early medieval monastic texts have received limited scholarly attention despite a wide medieval circulation. These sessions will focus on these marginalized texts, presenting their contents and the new perspectives they offer on monks and monasticism. One session will be dedicated to Hildemar of Corbie’s commentary on the Rule of Benedict; the other session will be open to papers on other texts.

Second session: From desert to dessert. Transformations of Asceticism

Description: Concepts like ‘asceticism’ are routinely used to cover a diverse range of practices and concepts. Papers are invited which explore what we mean by asceticism (or related terms, e.g., monk) and present more historicized and differentiated interpretations of these phenomena.

For submissions and further information, please contact Julian Hendrix: jhendrix1@carthage.edu.

albrechtdiem

Associate Professor in History, Syracuse University

More Posts - Website


Das könnte Dich auch interessieren …

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

Diese Website verwendet Akismet, um Spam zu reduzieren. Erfahre mehr darüber, wie deine Kommentardaten verarbeitet werden.